Saturday, 29 April 2017

Monday, 3 April 2017

The wonder of Silsden's sunlit springtime woodlands

Above: the uplifting power of primroses never wanes. The plant's generic name, primula, is derived from two Latin words meaning 'first rose', and refers to its March early flowering.
Above: admired by Wordsworth, the lesser celandine carpets woodlands with a bold splash of gold. The petals close up in dull weather, unlike the unrelated greater celandine.
Above: the delicate flowers of wood anemones are wide open in sunny weather but close and droop if it is cloudy or dusk. 

Sunday, 2 April 2017

More memories of Aire View School in the 1950s/early 1960s
I am indebted to Jill Murray (nee Whitaker) for this collection of six photos of Jill's Aire View School classes from 1956 to 1961. Pictured above are children at the nursery, which was in Prince Street.
Above: 1957. Headmistress Miss Edith Clarke is seated centre left.The class teacher with her is Miss Little.
Above: 1958. This photograph was taken in the hall of the old Methodist chapel, which was used when pupil numbers were too large to be accommodated in the Elliott Street school. The parish church hall was also used. Jill thinks the teacher is Miss Tillotson.
Above: 1959. Pupils are pictured on the steps in the park, in the area which served as the playground for outdoor classes.
Above: 1960. Another photo on the steps in the playing fields. The teacher is Mrs Belton, whose son Andrew became a local GP (as reported in my post of March 3rd 2017).
Above: 1961. In front of the main school building.

Sunday, 26 March 2017

A Silsden specialism: seats and savvy sentimentsThis photograph of genial gents on the Clog Bridge seat in the late 1960s/early 1970s has been provided by Jill Murray (nee Whitaker). On the right is Fred Wellock, who was married to Jill's mum's Aunt Jane. Originally from Appletreewick, Fred worked variously as a farmer, a coalman, a gamekeeper (while living at Blackpots) and finally at Steeton bobbin mill. Jill remembers his favourite saying was: "A day out of Silsden is a day wasted."

Sunday, 19 March 2017

Friends of Silsden's Green Places: another spirited addition to community wellbeing

Above: Joyce Kilvington, Darren Edwards (left) and Tim Barker, of Silsden's Friends of Green Places, were hard at work in the rain on Sunday morning, March 19th, digging and tidying the shrubbery on Clog Bridge. The Friends, formed in August 2016, carried out a clean-up at the Howden Road Cemetery as their first project. They have received Bradford council and town council grants to help maintain and improve Silsden's publicly-owned green places. The initiative was sparked by Joyce after she read a Facebook post lamenting untidiness at the cemetery. The Friends now have 55 members.

Friday, 10 March 2017

Signs of the times: from Kirkgate and the Messiah in the 1950s to Tattoo City and Age Concern today

 Above: a 1950s view of the shops from the (Primitive) Methodist Church grounds to the Post Office. The shop with the cigarette advertising boards (Senior Service and Capstan) and chewing-gum dispenser was Marion's, which as well as being a tobacconist sold toys and sweets. The owner was Marion Ritchie (nee Hardcastle). Next door was the chemist Herbert J Clark (with sunblind) and then came the iconic ironmonger Waterhouse's (Esso Blue paraffin stockist). The next shop was Ernest Todd's gardening-supplies outlet. Beyond was Nancy Lund's ladies' outfitters and then the Post Office. The chapel notice board on the left advertises a production of Handel's Messiah, which was an integral part of Silsden's choral calendar for 100 years or so. 
Above: the Messiah soloists, civic dignitaries and worshippers in 1951. Seated are the soloists (left to right) Arthur Gardner (tenor), Ursula Tunnicliffe (soprano), Margaret Bottomley (contralto), Jim Bradley (trumpet), Alice Bradley (accompanist) and Alan Murgatroyd (baritone). The VIPs in the row behind the soloists include Silsden Urban District Council chairman Horace Fortune (fifth from left) and his wife, Nellie Fortune (sixth from left). The Messiah was first performed in Silsden in 1875 and became an annual tradition into the 1970s with united church choirs at its heart.
Above: the same retail parade in 2017. The chemist, now Rowlands Pharmacy (previously Mitchells), occupies two shops. Tattoo City has been established in Kirkgate for three years, occupying what in my 1950s photograph was Waterhouse's ironmongery. Only the Post Office, which opened by the beck bridge in 1907, has outlived all the changes over the years. That too is due to move -- to Twigg's newsagents -- in the near future. What on earth were the planners thinking when they allowed the bizarre top-floor addition to what is now at street level the Dale Eddison premises?  
Above: the tattooist at work. The popularity of the art is a truly modern phenomenon.
Above: intricate designs like this one on the thigh of a customer take hours to accomplish.

Saturday, 4 March 2017

Hawber Cote: a pointer to pastoral pleasures but is it a suitable site for a school?

In my following post I refer to the forthcoming merger of the Aire View and Hothfield Street schools and the proposal to move the new primary school to purpose-built premises at Hawber Cote. It could be seen as a delightful rural setting for a school but access looks to be nigh impossible without major disturbances. Bradford council's favoured site is the fenced field bordering the bungalows in Hawber Cote Lane in my photograph above, taken from Hawber Lane, which is the route from Drabble House Farm to Swartha.
Above: the present farm (not public) access to the proposed site for the new primary school is through the gate at the top of Hawber Cote Lane.
Above: the road to and from Hawber Cote Lane is via Banklands Lane opposite the park. The junction is formed by Wayside Mews on the left, a new development, and Hawber Cote Lane on the right.